Review Article

Socio-Economic and Agrarian history of the Jatun Sumaco communities in the Ecuadorian Amazon

Alexandra Torres Navarrete* •Julio Cesar Vargas Burgos* •Yudel García Quintana* •Yasiel Arteaga Crespo

Published 09/30/2016 .
Email: atorres@uea.edu.ec




Author Affiliation

Alexandra Torres Navarrete. Universidad Estatal Amazónica. Campus Central, Paso Lateral Km 2 ½ Vía Puyo. Pastaza, Ecuador. Email: atorres@uea.edu.ec Julio Cesar Vargas Burgos. Universidad de Guayaquil. Campus Central, Km 22 via a Daule. Guayaquil, Ecuador. Email: jvargasburgos@yahoo.com Yudel García Quintana. Universidad Estatal Amazónica. Campus Central, Paso Lateral Km 2 ½ Vía Puyo. Pastaza, Ecuador. Email: ygarcia@uea.edu.ec Yasiel Arteaga Crespo. Universidad Estatal Amazónica. Campus Central, Paso Lateral Km 2 ½ Vía Puyo. Pastaza, Ecuador. Email: yarteaga@uea.edu.ec


Article History

Received: Sep 2016 / Accepted: Sep 2016/ Published: Sep 2016


How to Cite This Article

Navarrete, A. T., Burgos, J. C. V., Quintana, Y. G., & Crespo, Y. A. (2016). Socio-Economic and Agrarian history of the Jatun Sumaco communities in the Ecuadorian Amazon. International Journal of Agricultural and Life sciences, 2(3), 48-53. doi:10.9379-sf.ijals-122065-008-0081-x


Copyright

© 2016 Navarreteet al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use,distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author andsource are credited.


Competing Interests

The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.


Abstract

The purpose of this research was to analyze the socioeconomic and agrarian activity of the communities that make up the Jatun Sumaco parish, in the Napo province of the Ecuadorian Amazon, with the aim of contextualizing changes and transformations taking place in the rural sector to strengthen agriculture and livestock production models. On the basis of primary sources, documentary analysis methods related to agriculture, livestock and economic development programs in Ecuador were employed, as well as interviews with local people. The analysis of the theoretical referents showed that the Ecuadorian Amazon has undergone a complex process of agriculture-related changes as a result of the uncontrolled use of natural resources. The socioeconomic and agrarian history of the communities reflected its cultural character with a predominance of Kichwa indigenous ethnic groups; loss of identity values was observed in the young social fabric, as well as low income and full dependence on productive farm activities, Solanun quiotence being the most represented crop. The role and the importance of local governments, provincial councils, municipalities, parish councils and non-governmental organizations are recognized in rural communities and evidenced through the cacao, naranjilla and forest dialogue platforms.